What Do You Hunger For? 

A. W. Tozer once said, “we are all the sum total of our hungers.” James Allen in his book, As a Man Thinketh, states that “the soul attracts that which it secretly harbours; that which it loves, and also that whih it fears; it reaches the height of its cherished aspirations; it falls to the level of it’s unchastened desires–and circumstances are the means by which the soul receives its own.” Most all of us want more out of life yet he also said this of us as humans, “men are anxious to improve their circumstances, but are unwilling to improve themselves; they therefore remain bound.”
Contentment is an important virtue but contentment with our inward state in relation first to our spiritual growth and then our growth as human beings spells inward blindness. You see if we believe we have arrived we will not go any farther because it would be foolish in our eyes to waste time on such things. It can be easy to believe we have arrived when we have not. The key is this, we never arrive. Cultivate this mindset in your spiritual life and your personal growth. It will take you higher and further than you or I can imagine.  So what do you hunger for?  

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What art thou thrusting that thief-catcher into my face for, man?

Um-m. So he must. I do deem it now a most meaning thing, that that old Greek, Prometheus, who made men, they say, should have been a blacksmith, and animated them with fire; for what’s made in fire must properly belong to fire; and so hell’s probable. How the soot flies! This must be the remainder the Greek made the Africans of. Carpenter, when he’s through with that buckle, tell him to forge a pair of steel shoulder-blades; there’s a pedlar aboard with a crushing pack. Continue reading

Nor did wild rumors of all sorts fail to exaggerate

And as for those who, previously hearing of the White Whale, by chance caught sight of him; in the beginning of the thing they had every one of them, almost, as boldly and fearlessly lowered for him, as for any other whale of that species. But at length, such calamities did ensue in these assaults—not restricted to sprained wrists and ankles, broken limbs, or devouring amputations—but fatal to the last degree of fatality; those repeated disastrous repulses, all accumulating and piling their terrors upon Moby Dick; those things had gone far to shake the fortitude of many brave hunters, to whom the story of the White Whale had eventually come. Continue reading

I am Granser, a tired old man

“You do not know what soap is, and I shall not tell you, for I am telling the story of the Scarlet Death. You know what sickness is. We called it a disease. Very many of the diseases came from what we called germs. Remember that word—germs. A germ is a very small thing. It is like a woodtick, such as you find on the dogs in the spring of the year when they run in the forest. Only the germ is very small. It is so small that you cannot see it—”

Hoo-Hoo began to laugh.

“You’re a queer un, Granser, talking about things you can’t see. If you can’t see ’em, how do you know they are? That’s what I want to know. How do you know anything you can’t see?” Continue reading